Depression

Malibu Recovery Center believes that in addressing the co-occurring, dual diagnosis and associated conditions, in conjunction with the drug abuse and addiction issues, people are given the best chance for long-term recovery.

The modality of treatment provided to clients will depend on the status and/or outcome of each person’s current condition. There are a variety of antidepressant medications and psychotherapies that can be used to treat depression. Some people with milder forms of depression may do well with psychotherapy alone. People with moderate to severe depression will often benefit from antidepressants. Most do best with combined treatment: medication to gain relatively quick symptom relief and psychotherapy to learn more effective ways to deal with problems that include anxiety and/or depression.

Malibu Recovery Center introduces compassionate care in a healing environment. Services include:

  • Detox and / or medication management
  • Residential Treatment
  • Day Treatment
  • Parent and Teen Outpatient Services
  • Adult Outpatient Services
  • Alumni / Aftercare

Depression is an illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts. It affects the way a person eats and sleeps, the way one feels about oneself, and the way one thinks about things. “depression” is not the same as a sad mood. It is not a sign of personal weakness or a condition that can be willed away. People with depression cannot merely “snap out of it” and get better.

Sometimes we hear people casually say, “I’m depressed,” when they have had a bad day at work or an argument with a loved one. In these instances, we are not really “depressed,” but we are temporarily feeling sad, frustrated, overwhelmed, or stressed. These normal feelings come and go and are different than the more pervasive feelings associated with clinical depression. However, if depression persists for a period of two weeks or more, or is particularly distressing, then it is probably time to consult a mental health professional or a physician. Untreated depression can also increase a person’s risk of suicide. Up to 15% of those who are clinically depressed die by suicide.